Holiday Market features variety of artwork


By Rick Carpenter - rick@altustimes.com



Jane LaGree checks out the pricetag on Steve Sutherland’s mixed media art of a Native American riding a merry-go-round horse.


Rick Carpenter | Altus Times

Margaret Worrell, left, points to a cow painting while artist Lindsay McKenzie, right, redirects Margaret Worrell’s attention to a different cow painting Tuesday night at the Museum of the Western Prairie.


Rick Carpenter | Altus Times

Margaret Worrell, left, points to a cow painting while artist Lindsay McKenzie, right, redirects Margaret Worrell’s attention to a different cow painting Tuesday night at the Museum of the Western Prairie.


Rick Carpenter | Altus Times

The Western Trail Historical Society Inc. hosted a dozen artists at its fourth annual Holiday Market Tuesday night at the Museum of the Western Prairie.

The historical society raises money for the museum by having the artists donate a portion of their proceeds from the Holiday Market to the organization.

Jennie Buchanan, director of the Museum of the Western Prairie, said the annual fundraiser usually takes in more than $12,000 in sales in three hours. She declined to say how much the museum receives from the event.

The historical society selects a variety of artists with an emphasis on items that museum patrons can buy as Christmas gifts.

Meanwhile, a women’s group, which calls itself the “Winettes,” wraps gifts that are purchased at the event.

Local artist Lindsay McKenzie, who works under the rhythmic title “Art Frenzy by Lindsay McKenzie,” was selling her acrylic paintings from $18 to $302. She said she also sells decorative cookies but had collected about six-months’ worth of paintings for the sale.

McKenzie also paints murals and teaches acrylic painting classes.

At Tuesday’s event, her artwork focused on cows, sheep and local outdoor scenes from cotton to sunsets.

“I have to have the cows in perspective because people here know how cows should look,” she joked.

Across an aisle, Steve Sutherland, an artist from the Walters-Duncan area, displayed a recycled former merry-go-round horse with a Native American made of steel riding the horse. He was asking $2,800 for the piece. The steel and mixed-media artist said he once created a 10-foot guitar for the backyard of Altus Mayor Jack Smiley. He was going to bring a 7-foot Bowie knife he created but didn’t think it would fit in the tight space. For more reasonably priced items, he also sold garden stakes for $25.

Sutherland said his most unusual creation, a 7-foot pocketknife weighing 65 pounds, is in a gallery in Lake Tahoe, Nevada.

Other booths included jewelry, wooden bowls, pens, note cards and other artwork. Buchanan said she expected more than 300 people to attend the event.

http://www.altustimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/web1_Art-sale-3Grayscale.jpgRick Carpenter | Altus Times

Jane LaGree checks out the pricetag on Steve Sutherland’s mixed media art of a Native American riding a merry-go-round horse.
http://www.altustimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/web1_Art-sale-3.jpgJane LaGree checks out the pricetag on Steve Sutherland’s mixed media art of a Native American riding a merry-go-round horse. Rick Carpenter | Altus Times

Margaret Worrell, left, points to a cow painting while artist Lindsay McKenzie, right, redirects Margaret Worrell’s attention to a different cow painting Tuesday night at the Museum of the Western Prairie.
http://www.altustimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/web1_Art-sale-1-grayscale.jpgMargaret Worrell, left, points to a cow painting while artist Lindsay McKenzie, right, redirects Margaret Worrell’s attention to a different cow painting Tuesday night at the Museum of the Western Prairie. Rick Carpenter | Altus Times

Margaret Worrell, left, points to a cow painting while artist Lindsay McKenzie, right, redirects Margaret Worrell’s attention to a different cow painting Tuesday night at the Museum of the Western Prairie.
http://www.altustimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/web1_Art-sale-1.jpgMargaret Worrell, left, points to a cow painting while artist Lindsay McKenzie, right, redirects Margaret Worrell’s attention to a different cow painting Tuesday night at the Museum of the Western Prairie. Rick Carpenter | Altus Times

By Rick Carpenter

rick@altustimes.com

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